10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (2022)

Many RV accessories today are either gimmicky or completely unnecessary, however, there are a handful of must-have RV accessories that every RVer should own.

And one of these must-have RV accessories is RV leveling blocks, as they are indispensable when it comes to setting up a proper foundation for your RV while camping.

However, while RV leveling blocks might seem somewhat self-explanatory, there is often a lot of confusion around them.

So to help clear up any confusion around RV leveling blocks, we created this helpful guide, which answers 10 of the most common questions about RV leveling blocks and their use.

Are RV Leveling Blocks Necessary?

One of the most common questions about RV leveling blocks is if they’re necessary in the first place?

As many RV beginners fail to grasp the importance of having a level RV.

So we thought we’d highlight some of the main reasons why you should level your RV and use RV leveling blocks.

Why You Need to Level Your RV and Use RV Leveling Blocks

  1. Minimizes Stress on RV Frame and Structure – To minimize stress on the frame and structure of the RV, you should always level the RV before using it.
  2. Improves RV Functionality – Because RVs are intended and designed to be used while level, RV components, such as door frames, drawers, cabinets, and plumbing systems will function far better when level.
  3. Improves RV Fridge Performance and Safety – Most RVs have electric/propane fridges that need to be level to function properly. In fact, using an electric/propane fridge unlevel can potentially lead to safety issues and even fire.
  4. Provides More Accurate Tank Level Readings – If the RV is not completely level, the RV tank sensors will not read correctly.
  5. Reduces Stress on Slide-Outs and Improves Long Term Reliability – RV slide-outs are designed to be operated while they’re level, as unlevel operation creates additional wear and tear on the mechanisms, potentially leading to premature failure.
  6. Improves Comfort – While using an RV unlevel is hard on the RV, it’s also hard on people, as it’s very uncomfortable to walk around and hang out inside an unlevel RV.

What Do You Use to Level a Camper?

What you need to level a camper depends largely on what type of RV you have and whether or not that RV has an automatic leveling system or leveling jacks.

Beginner Tip – Stabilizing jacks and leveling jacks are not the same thing, as most travel trailers are equipped with stabilizing jacks, which are intended to stabilize the RV only and not meant to lift or level the RV.

ItemDescriptionPrice
10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (1)Leveling BlocksDesigned to be stacked on top of each other and parked on, to manually level an RV.Check Amazon Price
10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (2)Leveling Block CapDesigned to be placed on top of leveling blocks to provide a smooth level surface for tires or jack pads.Check Amazon Price
10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (3)Leveler SystemDesigned to be a cross between leveling blocks and wheel chocks, levelers allow for RV height adjustment without stacking blocks.Check Amazon Price
10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (4)Wheel ChockWedge of sturdy material typically made from rubber or plastic designed to be placed under a wheel to immobilize the vehicle.Check Amazon Price
10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (5)X-Shaped Wheel ChocksDesigned for use on tandem RV axles, X-shaped wheel chocks, chock, and stabilize the RV by applying opposing pressure to the tires.Check Amazon Price
10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (6)Stabilizing Jack PadsDesigned to be placed under leveling jacks or stabilizing jacks to help disperse the load and keep the jacks from sinking into the ground.Check Amazon Price
10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (7)Bubble LevelUsed to find and mark level by utilizing a floating bubble indicator.Check Amazon Price
10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (8)Wireless Leveling SystemLinks to your smartphone, to give you a real-time level indicator.Check Amazon Price

How Do You Level a Camper with Leveling Blocks?

While there are several different ways to level an RV, one of the most common is to use leveling blocks, which we’ve outlined below.

Step 1: Determine How Level the Camper Is

Before you can level the camper, you first need to find out how unlevel the RV is by using either a bubble level or wireless leveling system like this popular one from LevelMatePRO on Amazon, to determine which part of the RV needs to be raised to level the RV.

Step 2: Use RV Leveling Blocks On the Low Side of The Camper

10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (9)

Once you’ve determined the low side of the camper and estimated how much lift you need to add to level the RV, you want to stack RV leveling blocks in a pyramid design either in front of or behind the wheels on the low side.

Step 3: Drive Onto the Leveling Blocks to Level

Now that you have the RV leveling blocks stacked next to the wheels on the low side of the camper, all you need to do is slowly drive onto the leveling blocks to level out the RV from side to side.

Step 4: Check for Level and Adjust Accordingly

Once you’ve driven onto the RV leveling blocks, you want to check for level again, to ensure that the RV is completely level from side to side.

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If the RV is not level after checking, adjust accordingly until the RV is level.

Step 5: Chock the Wheels

10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (10)

Now that the camper is level from side to side, you need to chock the wheels before unhitching, to ensure that the RV doesn’t move, by either using standard wheel chocks or x-shaped wheel chocks for tandem axles.

Step 6: Level the Camper Front to Back

The final step to level the camper is to level the trailer from front to back, which you can accomplish by either raising or lowering the trailer hitch up or down as needed.

How High Can You Stack RV Leveling Blocks?

RV leveling blocks are very stable, thanks to their modular interlinking construction, especially when they’re stacked in a pyramid design.

However, it’s generally recommended to not stack RV leveling blocks any higher than four to five inches tall, depending on their construction and brand.

Which would be four to five leveling blocks, as each RV leveling block provides 1 inch of lift.

How Much Weight Can Leveling Blocks Hold?

RV leveling blocks are designed and constructed to support a lot of weight, as some of the largest RVs can weigh as much as 30,000 pounds or 15 tons.

Because of this, most RV leveling blocks can support between 30,000 and 40,000 pounds, depending on their construction and brand.

How Many Leveling Blocks Do You Need for a Travel Trailer?

How many leveling blocks you need to level a travel trailer depends on several different factors, including how level the campsite is and whether you have a single or tandem axle trailer.

However, in general, two stacks of 10 or a total of 20 leveling blocks should allow you to level a single or tandem axle travel trailer on even the most unlevel campsite.

As this amount of leveling blocks will provide you with enough to place under the tires of the camper as well as under the stabilizing jacks, which is important.

Because once you start raising a portion of the trailer, you’ll need to stack leveling blocks under the corresponding stabilizer jacks, so that they can reach the ground and prevent them from being overextended.

Do You Need Leveling Blocks if You Have Leveling Jacks?

If you have an electric or hydraulic leveling system and leveling jacks on your RV, you don’t need leveling blocks.

However, you might want to consider investing in either a set of stabilizing jack pads or RV snap pads to provide a more stable and solid footing for your leveling jacks.

What are the Best RV Leveling Blocks?

While there are dozens of different RV leveling blocks on the market today from a wide variety of manufacturers, the below three options are by far the best and most popular choices.

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1. Tri-Lynx Lynx Levelers

10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (11)

Quick Specs

  • Quantity – 10 Pack
  • Type: Modular Interlocking Blocks
  • Dimensions: 8.5 x 8.5 x 1.5 Inches
  • Lift: 1 Inch Per
  • Max Recommend Height: 5 Inches
  • Max Load: 40,000 Pounds
  • Warranty: 10 Year

2. Camco Heavy Duty Leveling Blocks

10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (12)

Quick Specs

  • Quantity – 10 Pack
  • Type: Modular Interlocking Blocks
  • Dimensions: 8.5 x 8.5 x 1 Inch
  • Lift: 1 Inch Per
  • Max Recommended Height: 4 Inches
  • Max Load: Unspecified
  • Warranty: 1 Year

3. Anderson Hitches Camper Leveler System

10 Things You Need to Know About RV Leveling Blocks | RV Owner HQ (13)

Quick Specs

  • Quantity – 2 Pack
  • Type: Adjustable Leveler (Wheel Chock Included)
  • Dimensions: Approximately 15 x 6 x 5 Inches
  • Lift: 1/2 to 4 Inches
  • Max Load: 30,000 Pounds
  • Warranty: Lifetime

What are the Best RV Leveling Blocks for Dual Wheels?

While you might think that you need a different type of RV leveling block if you have an RV with dual wheels or a tandem axle, this is not the case.

As dual wheel or tandem axle RVs use the same type of RV leveling blocks as single wheel or single axle RVs.

This means that the best RV leveling blocks are also the best RV leveling blocks for dual wheels or tandem axles.

How Do You Make Do It Yourself RV Leveling Blocks?

While there are advantages to using RV leveling blocks from companies like Tri-Lynx or Camco, many RVers choose to make their own leveling blocks, as this tends to be cheaper, especially if you need to do a lot of leveling.

As RV leveling blocks from Tri-Lynx or Camco usually cost between $30 and $40 for a pack of 10, while homemade RV leveling blocks made from wood usually cost $20 or less and might even be free if you have some scrap wood laying around.

So if you want to save some money on RV leveling blocks or just like DIY projects, we’ve outlined how to make your own do-it-yourself RV leveling blocks below.

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Step 1: Select Appropriate Size Wood

When choosing wood for RV leveling blocks, you want to use dimensional lumber that is wide enough to accommodate the whole tire, which for travel trailers will usually be a 2×8, and for motorhomes will usually be a 2×10.

As motorhome tires are typically slightly wider compared to travel trailer tires.

It’s always a good idea though to measure your particular tires to ensure you choose the right size wood.

Also, when selecting lumber, don’t forget that you want to look at the actual measurements of the dimensional lumber and not the nominal size, as the actual measurements will always be smaller.

Step 2: Decide Between Treated or Untreated Wood

Once you’ve chosen the right size wood for your particular RV tires, you need to decide between either treated or untreated wood, which each has its own pros and cons.

Treated Lumber

  • More Expensive
  • More Resistant to Moisture and Insects
  • Longer Life Span
  • Heavier

Untreated Lumber

  • Less Expensive
  • Less Resistant to Moisture and Insects
  • Shorter Life Span
  • Lighter

Step 3: Decide On How Many Leveling Blocks You Will Need

How many leveling blocks you need will depend on the type of RV you have and how level or unlevel a particular campsite is.

Ideally, though you should have at least two leveling blocks for each wheel or set of wheels.

Step 4: Measure How Long the Boards Need to Be

How long the boards need to be for RV leveling blocks, will depend on whether your RV has a single or double axle, how high you need to stack the leveling blocks, and how much cushion you want on either side of the tire.

But as a general rule, single axle RVs should have RV leveling blocks with a base length of at least 32 inches, while dual wheel or tandem axle RVs should have RV leveling blocks with a base length of at least 64 inches.

Again though it’s best to measure your own RV tires, to ensure your boards are long enough not only for the span of the tire or tires but also to accommodate for the extra length needed to stack several leveling blocks on top of each other.

Step 5: Cut to Length and Add a 45-Degree Angle at the End of Each Board

Now that you know how many boards you need and how long they need to be, all you need to do now is cut them to length.

Don’t forget to add a 45-degree angle to the end of each board, as this will help to reduce stress on the tire as well as on the board, as you drive your RV onto your DIY leveling blocks.

Step 6: Don’t Forget About Wheel Chocks

Now that you’ve created your DIY leveling blocks, don’t forget that you also need to create DIY wheel chocks as well, to keep the RV from moving once you’ve leveled it.

Which can easily be made by taking a small section of 4×4 post and cutting a 45-degree angle on one end.

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To see other must-have RV accessories, check out our article “20 Must-Have RV Accessories Under $20“.

Jason Kidd

Jason is an avid lover of RVs and the RV lifestyle. He is both a writer and editor for RV Owner HQ and has been RVing and camping for over 20 years.

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FAQs

Do you use chocks with leveling blocks? ›

If you're good to go, place a wheel chock in front of the tire you lifted (on the opposite side the level is on) so that your wheel doesn't roll forward. A wheel chock is not a leveling block and should not be used as one.

How do you stack RV leveling blocks? ›

They come in packs of 10 and are available in two sizes. Eight. And a half inches square and eight

Should you put blocks under stabilizer jacks? ›

Yes, you should always put blocks under your stabilizer jacks. This not only helps protect your jacks but the campsite as well. You may even come across some campgrounds or RV parks that require a barrier between your landing gear and the campsite surface.

How do you use level blocks on an RV? ›

Before you start leveling you want to have your RV in the exact. Position that it will end up once

How high can you stack leveling blocks? ›

You should avoid stacking camper leveling blocks more than 4” high. Each leveling block is typically an inch, so do not stack more than four leveling blocks high.

How do you chock RV wheels on leveling blocks? ›

RV 101® - Understanding RV Wheel Chocks - YouTube

What do you put under Levelling jacks? ›

I also like to use jack pads under the leveling jacks. This helps from sinking into softer ground such as grass or sand. They also protect the concrete or asphalt driveway you might be on.

Should stabilizer jacks be fully extended? ›

Stabilizer jacks are often located at the front and rear of units. Each jack is in place when it touches the ground. Don't extend it any further, because it could get stuck or damaged in the process.

How much pressure should an RV Stabilizer jack have? ›

Correct Use of Stabilizing Jacks - YouTube

Do you level RV with slides in or out? ›

So what's the right answer? Level and put your slides out according to your RV's user manual. Any professional should tell you that the typical recommendation is to level first, then put your slides out. However, they'll also state you should go with what your manufacturer states in your owner's manual.

How close should an RV be to level? ›

Generally, I've found you can be 3 degrees off from side to side and 6 degrees off from front to back. This is the fridge's side to side NOT the RV's. This works out to be about a half bubble on your RV's indicator. Any time you are stopped for 30 minutes or more you should either level your RV or turn off your fridge.

Do RVS need to be level when not in use? ›

Minimize Stress on the Frame and Structure. If your RV is not level, you are adding stress to many areas including door frames, plumbing, cupboards, and even the chassis. An RV was built to be level so you could be causing long term issues and damage if you are using it without it being properly leveled.

How high can you stack Camco leveling blocks? ›

Camco's FasTen Leveling Blocks 2x2 measure 8 ½-inches x 8 ½-inches each and can be used with stack jacks, trailer tongues, fifth wheel jacks and swing arm supports. If dirt or debris build up in the leveling blocks, just knock it off and hose it out before storage. Stack height should not exceed 4 ½-inches.

What level should a trailer be for a refrigerator? ›

Most recreational refrigerators will work properly as long as they are within 2 degrees of level side to side and 4 degrees of level front to back. More modern models of RV fridges are more forgiving, allowing for proper operation within 3 degrees of level side to side and 6 degrees of level front to back.

How do I calibrate my RV leveling system? ›

LCI Auto Level not working: how to set level calibration - YouTube

How much weight can leveling blocks hold? ›

The weight capacity of leveling blocks varies by manufacturer, but most can hold between 30,000 and 40,000 pounds.

What is the best way to level a camper? ›

The easiest way to do this is to place the level on the tongue of the trailer. This will let you know if one side is higher than the other, which will inform which side you want to raise. Now that you know which side is too low, put boards or leveling blocks behind the wheels you need to raise.

What is the best leveling pads for a RV? ›

Best RV Leveling Blocks For 2022
  • Camco 44510 Heavy Duty Leveling Blocks : Most Versatile.
  • Ox Gord ACLR-02 Leveling Ramps : Budget.
  • Lynx Levelers 00015 : Best Value.
  • BAL Light 28050 : Best for Light Trailers.
  • Andersen Hitches 3604 : Premium.
14 Mar 2022

Do you need to chock both sides of RV? ›

Just always make sure that you place the chock or rock in front of the tire where the incline is (sometimes this may be on the back side of the tire if the incline is leaning towards the rear end of your trailer). To be extra safe, I recommend you chock both sides of each trailer.

What angle do you cut wheel chocks? ›

The 45 degree angle provides an optimal split in the load to the wheel and pavement (for a straight cut). Although a cupped cut is theoretically better than a straight cut, it would have increased the complexity of the build considerably.

Do I need to chock both wheels? ›

Always use wheel chocks in pairs. Wheel chocks must be positioned downhill and below the vehicle's center of gravity. On a downhill grade, position the chocks in front of the front wheels. On an uphill grade, position the chocks behind the rear wheels.

What do you put under RV jacks? ›

Good RV jack pads or Utility Blocks can not only level your RV but can also spread the weight of the jack over a wider surface, protecting the surface beneath it. This is always helpful, but can sometimes be critical for keeping an RV from sinking into the ground when it's standing on jacks alone.

How do I stop my RV from rocking when parked? ›

The best way to stop your travel trailer from rocking is by using a combination of leveling jacks which reduce up and down motion, stabilizers that reduce side to side motion, and wheel chocks to reduce any movement of the tires.

How do I stop my camper from shaking when walking? ›

Camper Shakes When Walking Fix - YouTube

How tight should travel trailer stabilizer jacks be? ›

Tighten them down snug to the ground, or crank them to take 'some' weight? They are for stability to prevent the trailer from rocking. If the ground is firm they only need to take a light pressure. If you are on soft grass you can crank them down a bit more.

How do you lubricate RV stabilizer jacks? ›

Stabilizer Jacks Maintenance | Lube Campers & Travel Trailers - YouTube

Should I store my RV with the stabilizer jacks down? ›

When it comes to parking your camp trailer in storage, there is really no need to have the stabilizer jacks down. From a mechanical or structural standpoint, having the jacks down while storing the trailer does not make a difference.

How do you raise RV jacks manually? ›

Ground Control 3 Electric Jack Manual Override - YouTube

How do I maintain my RV hydraulic leveling jack? ›

Hydraulic Jacks

Some recommend to clean the leveler cylinder with warm, soapy water and then spray a dry lubricant, such as WD-40, and wipe off the excess. Other manufacturers recommend using a silicone lubricant. Be sure to do research for your brand of jacks before using any products on them.

When should wheel chocks be used? ›

OSHA requires that trailer operators set the brakes and use wheel chocks on the rear wheels to prevent accidents resulting from trailer movement, especially during loading and unloading procedures.

How do you use chocks leveling? ›

MMM TV technical - how to use motorhome levelling blocks

Are wheel chocks necessary? ›

A wheel chock is an important tool because a parking brake alone often isn't enough to keep a vehicle from rolling during a towing job. It's also important to stabilize tires and vehicles when they're being transported so they don't come loose and cause injury.

Do I need to use wheel chocks? ›

Safety laws suggest that wheel chocks are essential for every commercial vehicle. Wheel chocks are used to stop vehicles from rolling when they are parked – especially on a hill. It is extremely dangerous when the brakes give way on a large commercial vehicle, potentially damaging anything that gets in its way.

What can I use instead of wheel chocks? ›

Bricks would be safe enough as wheel chocks because the rubber tyre spreads the load. (Imagine trying to chock a railway wagon with a brick however, and it would be another matter.) But all the same, the proper wedge-shaped blocks are probably best.

Do you need to chock both sides of RV? ›

Just always make sure that you place the chock or rock in front of the tire where the incline is (sometimes this may be on the back side of the tire if the incline is leaning towards the rear end of your trailer). To be extra safe, I recommend you chock both sides of each trailer.

How many chocks do you need for an RV? ›

RVs and heavy trailers fall into this category. Therefore, you should use one chock per tire to make sure it does not roll away. Using four chocks also secures both the front and back end to limit movement. For smaller trailers or fifth wheels, you may be able to get away with two chocks.

What angle do you cut wheel chocks? ›

The 45 degree angle provides an optimal split in the load to the wheel and pavement (for a straight cut). Although a cupped cut is theoretically better than a straight cut, it would have increased the complexity of the build considerably.

How many chocks do I need? ›

The standard notes that chocks should be placed under the rear wheels, which means two chocks should be used – chocking just one wheel isn't enough. If operators are chocking both sides of the wheels, then you must have a total of four chocks – two for each side.

What is the best way to level a camper? ›

The easiest way to do this is to place the level on the tongue of the trailer. This will let you know if one side is higher than the other, which will inform which side you want to raise. Now that you know which side is too low, put boards or leveling blocks behind the wheels you need to raise.

How tall should wheel chocks be? ›

Ideally, the correct wheel chock should be about 1/4 of the tire's height. This means that if the vehicle has 36-inch tires, the wheel chock should be about 9 inches in height. This should allow the chock to fit securely under the tire.

Do bricks work as wheel chocks? ›

Don't take chances with your own safety—only manufactured chocks that have been approved for use on vehicles the make and size of your own should trusted for blocking. Despite seeming solid, bricks, cinder blocks, and other composite materials are easily crushed when put under enough pressure.

How long do wheel chocks last? ›

Some manufacturers say plastic chocks last around four years.

What are smart chocks? ›

SMART CHOCK® is an innovative trailer restraint system that secures your vehicle while effectively communicating with drivers and loading dock workers to offer a safe and productive work environment.

Why do you use wheel chocks on trailer without spring brakes? ›

If the trailer does not have spring brakes, use wheel chocks to keep the trailer from moving. The tractor protection valve keeps air in the tractor or truck brake system should the trailer break away or develop a bad leak. The tractor protection valve is controlled by the "trailer air supply" control valve in the cab.

Can you use wood as wheel chocks? ›

Wood wheel chocks are often used for aviation applications. However, urethane or rubber is much better option for this industry. Wood will quickly become waterlogged, which drastically increases its weight and makes it much more difficult to handle.

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